International Celebrations of Mother’s Day

Happy Mother’s Day! This special holiday was officially recognized in the US in 1914 and is celebrated around the world (though on different days). Read about the most interesting and endearing Mother’s Day traditions from around the world, and who knows! Maybe next year you’ll organize a Mexican-themed Mother’s Day and hire a mariachi band instead of taking Mom out to brunch.

Rose
© Pixabay

Argentina

This South American nation is the only country that celebrates Mother’s Day in mid-October! The tradition began as a Catholic holiday—a celebration of the Maternity of the Blessed Virgin Mary—and later combined with the secular American holiday.

France

The French began celebrating Mother’s Day in the early 1900s, when a group of women were recognized for having nine children. At this time, France was experiencing dangerously low birth rates, so the celebration encouraged others to have more children.

Israel

Israelities celebrate Mother’s Day in February, but it’s not an officially recognized holiday. Most consider it a family day instead, in which the entire family is celebrated.

Brazil

Mother’s Day in Brazil is the second most commercially lucrative Holiday! The jewelry, flower, chocolate, and restaurant industries rejoice.

Australia

Chrysanthemums are the flowers of choice for Mother’s Day in Australia: men wear them on their shirts—and the flower’s name ends in mum.

Sweden

Due to the abundance of flowers and berries in the spring, many children forage and create wildflower bouquets for their mothers.

Mexico

Called Día de las Madres, Mexicans have promoted Mother’s Day since the 1930s. In the morning, many children serenade their mothers or hire a mariachi band to sing a song called “Las Mañanitas.”

UK

Generally celebrated in March, Mother’s Day in the UK is actually a combination of Mother’s Day and a Brittish tradition called Mothering Day. Many enjoy simnel cake, a light fruit cake make with fresh and dried fruit.

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