Fika: the Swedish Coffee Break

This little coffee break that we’ve come to know as fika is one of the most quintessential Swedish traditions. Whether doing fika alone or with friends, at home or in the office, the most important thing is that everyone enjoy it at least once during the day. We spoke to Lena Khoury, one of the co-owners of the well-loved New York City coffee shop of the same name, who is just as obsessed with the tradition as we are: “Fika is a way to stay balanced and connected. It’s how you connect and socialize.” With 18 coffee shops throughout New York, an online store, and plans to expand, Fika is quickly becoming one of the top coffee shops in the city. Read on to discover what local Swedes enjoy during their own fika coffee breaks.

Fika
© Try The World

1. Cookies

Delicious on their own or dipped into coffee, Gille’s oat sandwich cookies from the Sweden Box are an essential addition to fika.

2. Kanelbullar

A popular fika pairing, kanelbullar is a Swedish cinnamon bun. They’re so common in Swedish homes that almost every host offers one to guests.

3. Licorice

Sweet, salty, or sour, Swedes love them all! The sweet variety from your Sweden Box is a great addition to your fika coffee break.

4. Mazariner

Marziner, or mini almond tarts, are made with an almond filling and icing topping—delicious with coffee and other treats!

5. Cardamom cake

Cardamom is one of Sweden’s favorite spices, and is commonly baked into cakes and other desserts. Khoury swears by these cakes as an accompaniment to her coffee.

6. Berry tarts

It’s no surprise that Swedes love berry desserts—their forests are full of so many varieties!

7. Fudge

Ultra sweet and slightly fruity, the fudge from the Sweden Box is an indulgence that no one with a sweet tooth could turn down.

8. Open-faced sandwiches

That’s right! You can eat savory foods during fikam too. Top Mörsjö Deli flatbread crisps from the Sweden Box with mustard, lingonberry jam, smoked salmon, or vegetables.

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